Sorting things out classification and its consequences. Sorting Things Out 2019-03-24

Sorting things out classification and its consequences Rating: 4,8/10 884 reviews

Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences by Geoffrey C. Bowker

sorting things out classification and its consequences

Forgot my book at home today and started reading it again during lunch. They are continually changing, via processes of negotiation and resistance, and through adjustments to other elements within the respective mega-systems. The survey treatment , however, leads to multiple examples that pile on and do not advance the argument. Sorting Things Out, by communications theorists Geoffrey C. Infrastructures are likewise invisible and lose their transparency only when they begin to break down.

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Sorting things out : classification and its consequences (eBook, 1999) [aimtheory.com]

sorting things out classification and its consequences

But Bowker and Star do address the fact that their method at bottom is one that can be at time down right boring. The E-mail message field is required. We welcome your comments about this article. This book has a moral agenda, for each standard and category valorizes some point of view and silences another. They investigate a variety of classification systems, including the International Classification of Diseases, the Nursing Interventions Classification, race classification under apartheid in South Africa, and the classification of viruses and of tuberculosis.

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Bowker & Star 1999: Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences

sorting things out classification and its consequences

. Selecting how the physical world is categorized is a human element dependent upon one's judgment, yet it also allows us to segregate undesirable qualities. Bowker and Susan Leigh Star explore the role of categories and standards in shaping the modern world. Description: 1 online resource xii, 377 pages : illustrations, maps. In the millennial census, Americans will be able to choose more than one racial category. But the analysis doesn't stop there; the authors go on to explore what happens to our thinking as a result of our classifications.

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Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences

sorting things out classification and its consequences

Better hope your doctor will classify you as hypotensive because prophylactics were illegal, but hypotensive medication a side use of the pill is a-ok. Bowker and Star weave together their theories, their empirical findings, and their methodologies in a fluid, intellectually dense manner. Bowker and Leigh explore how people develop classifications and then how those classifications change lives. Really important considerations about embedded values in infrastructure, time as a constraint on organizing systems, and offers many important examples of how information systems and classification causes either suffering or advantage, depending on who is being classified. Visiting apartheid South Africa as an African American woman? Sorting Things Out has a moral agenda, for each standard and category valorizes some point of view and silences another.

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Sorting things out: classification and its consequences

sorting things out classification and its consequences

The effect of their sample critiques and examples is to illustrate how values, policies and modes of practice become embedded in large information systems and become expressed in classification systems. The authors develop concepts to make sense of the discussions and d The book was very interesting, but hard to read. By not looking at the preexisting structures around us we miss the nuances that reveal so much about ourselves. Series Title: Responsibility: Geoffrey C. The authors emphasize the role of invisibility in the process by which classification orders human interaction. Sorting Things Out has a moral agenda, for each standard and category valorizes some point of view and silences another. How these choices are made and how we think about that process are at the moral and political core of this work.

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Sorting Things Out

sorting things out classification and its consequences

Previous perspectives emphasized one or the other, thereby reinforcing a dualistic view. We are moving toward a world where systems are more inter-connected than ever, and it is classifications and standards that form the infrastructure for these systems. Classifications are ubiquitous in the world around us and tend to implicitly shape the way we view our world. What does the y axis mean for the biography trajectory? They advise us to recognize the political and ethical implications of infrastructure, to maintain flexibility by keeping the voice of the classifier on record, to be sensitive to exclusion and aware of the multiplicitous nature of classifications. Hope you don't need to use the airport restroom, because there isn't one available to people in your category.

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Bowker & Star 1999: Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences

sorting things out classification and its consequences

In Sorting Things Out, Geoffrey C. It thus can be an eye-opener particularly if one works in a field where classifications, standards and regulations play an important role — and there are many. The authors develop concepts to make sense of the discussions and developments of classifications. A revealing and surprising look at how classification systems can shape both worldviews and social interactions. The book is an important empirical source for understanding the building of information infrastructures. Jobs are made and lost; some regions benefit at the expense of others.

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Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences

sorting things out classification and its consequences

You want money to research the tropical diseases that are killing your neighbors? Those that were hard to classify had their lives put in limbo, as doing the things you were allowed to do according to your classified race could be taken as evidence for your race in a self-perpetuating mannor. On the other hand, the authors do give the reader several useful guidelines for the analysis of any large infrastructural system p. In a clear and lively style, they investigate a variety of classification systems, including the International Classification of Diseases, the Nursing Interventions Classification, race classification under apartheid in South Africa, and the classification of viruses and of tuberculosis. Susan Leigh Star Susan Leigh Star was Doreen Boyce Chair for Library and Information Science, University of Pittsburgh. They examine how categories are made and kept invisible, and how people can change this invisibility when necessary. All are examples of classification -- the scaffolding of information infrastructures.

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Sorting Things Out [Review]

sorting things out classification and its consequences

Categories in this sense arise from work and from other kinds of organized activity, including the conflicts over meaning that occur when multiple groups fight over the nature of a classification systems and its categories. Cognitive psychologists have measured how concepts fit in categories. They examine how categories are made and kept invisible, and how people can change this invisibility when necessary. Bowker and Star analyze social and medical classification schemes to best illustrate how the use of categorizing influences our society. The disease classification example is quite thorough - especially about the ways standards evolve over time - but all four examples give ample detail while being quite approachable. These three, formerly disparate areas, collide in modern information systems that attempt, for example, to organize web pages in categories that the general public will find useful.

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Sorting Things Out: Classification and its Consequences

sorting things out classification and its consequences

As Michaels Serres argues, the sciences are very good at what they do and the task of the philosopher is to keep open and explore the spaces that otherwise would be left dark and unvisited because of their very success, since new forms of knowledge might arise out of these spaces. The disease classification example is quite thorough - especially about the ways standards evolve over time - but all four examples give ample detail while being quite approachable. There are small, everyday certainties in my life that are blurred in the lives of others: such as checking the box for Female on standardized forms. We support a variety of open access funding models for select books, including monographs, trade books, and textbooks. Bowker and Susan Leigh Star explore the role of categories and standards in shaping the modern world. In this section, we see how nurses from Iowa, feeling largely marginalized and underappreciated, took the initiative to show that they were more than a bed in a hospital, formulating a long list of services nurses provide to the patient and doctor. Body is the state of the body's health; biography is the normal life of the patient appointments, work, etc.

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